Sep 28, 2021  
OHIO University Graduate Catalog 2007-09 
    
OHIO University Graduate Catalog 2007-09 [Archived Catalog]

Academic Policies and Procedures


Click on a link to be taken to the entry below.

 

Standards of Work

Conferral of either a master’s or doctoral degree requires at least a B (3.0) GPA. The GPA in formal coursework is computed separately from the average in research, thesis, and dissertation credits to determine eligibility for graduation. A GPA of at least B (3.0) is required in each category. No grade below C (2.0) can be used to satisfy any degree or certificate requirement. Departments may establish more rigorous standards.

All graduate students are expected to maintain at least an overall B (3.00) GPA on a continuing basis. Should you achieve less than an overall B (3.00) GPA, the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled will solicit a written statement from your departmental graduate committee to justify your continuation in the program.

Grading Information

^TOP

At the close of a session or upon completion of a class, the instructor reports a final grade indicating the quality of a student’s work in the class. The University Registrar’s deadlines for submitting grades each quarter or session must be met. Failure to do so creates problems for students such as loss of employment, scholarships, financial aid, and opportunities for further study. Once grades are submitted to the University Registrar, they are final and cannot be changed unless evidence of an error can be presented or a formal grade appeal process is completed in accordance with Ohio University’s official grade appeal policy (see “Grade Appeals” below). Grades cannot be changed by arranging to complete additional work. Grade point values are assigned for each quarter hour of credit completed according to the grading system below.

Academic work at Ohio University is evaluated on the following grading system: a grade of A equals 4.00; A- equals 3.67; B+ equals 3.33; B equals 3.0; B- equals 2.67; C+ equals 2.33; C equals 2.0; C- equals 1.67; D+ equals 1.33; D equals 1.0; D- equals 0.67; and F equals 0.0.

The basis for determining your scholastic standing is the GPA. This average is determined by dividing the total number of grade points you have earned by the total number of quarter hours of credit you have attempted. For example, if you have earned a B (3.0) and an A (4.0) in each of two five-hour courses, first calculate the number of grade points by multiplying the number of hours in each course by the point value for that grade (5x3=15 and 5x4=20). Divide the total number of grade points by the number of hours attempted (35÷10=3.5). Your GPA after completing the two courses would be 3.5. GPA is calculated on all attempts at all courses numbered 500 and higher. This means the original grade in a course that is retaken is not dropped from the accumulative GPA.

Your GPA is figured only on credit hours in courses for which you receive either letter grades, an FN (failure, never attended), or an FS (failure, stopped attending). FN and FS have the same value as an F.

The following grades also may be recorded: Credit (CR) is usually awarded for satisfactory completion of seminars, research projects, and thesis or dissertation credit. You may receive a grade of Progress (PR) in courses that are not yet complete or that extend over more than one quarter. Grades of CR or PR are not used in computing your GPA. An Incomplete (I) indicates that you have made progress in a course but have not finished the work required to receive a letter grade. These hours are not counted in quarter hours attempted, hours earned, or grade points until a letter grade is reported. The student must complete the work within the first six weeks of his or her next quarter of enrollment or tow years from the end of the term in which the grade of “I” was given, whichever comes first, or the “I” converts automatically to an “F.” The instructor may request a one-time extension to the end of the quarter by completing a request for the extension through the Registrar’s Office. When the student applies for graduation, any Incompletes on record will be calculated as “F” grades for the purpose of determining eligibility for graduation and will be converted to “F” upon graduation.

Determination of appropriate use of letter grades, CR, PR, or I is made by the department and is recorded in the Office of the University Registrar.

A grade of No Report (NR) is assigned when: 1) The instructor does not report the grade; 2) The instructor reports the grade too late for processing; or 3) The instructor reports an ineligible grade for the grade eligibility of the course. Check with the instructor; if a grade was submitted, contact the Office of the University Registrar to learn what is necessary to clear up the problem.

WP/WF-Withdrawn Passing/Withdrawn Failing is given when a course is dropped after the 15th day of the quarter. This grade does not count in the GPA

FN-Failure, Never Attended is given when you do not drop a class for which you are officially registered but did not attend. It counts as an F in your GPA

FS-Failure, Stopped Attending is given when you stop attending but do not officially drop a course for which you registered and attended at least once. In addition, the last date of attendance indicated is recorded on the student’s academic record. It counts as an F in your GPA

Removal of FN or FS from the record (treating the course, for tuition and grade purposes, as though it had been dropped by the 15th calendar day of the quarter) requires action by the late course withdrawal review panel.

Graduate level courses (500 and higher) may not be taken with a Pass/Fail grading option.

Grade Appeals

The instructor assigned to a class has full responsibility for grading, subject to the appeal process described in this section. A student may appeal a grade through the chairperson of the department to the dean of the college, provided that a concerted effort was made by the student to resolve the matter with the instructor. The burden of proof for a grade change is on the student, except in those cases involving charges of academic dishonesty. If the dean concludes that the student has insufficient grounds for an appeal, there can be no further appeal by the student. If the dean concludes that sufficient grounds do exist for an appeal, the dean shall appoint a faculty committee of five members, including the chairperson of the department or director of the school in question, to consider the case. If a majority on the committee decide that the grade should be changed and the instructor does not accept the recommendation, the committee can authorize the registrar to change the grade. The decision of the committee is not subject to further appeal. In appeal cases in which the chairperson is the instructor, the dean is authorized to appoint an alternative member from the same department to the committee; if the dean is the instructor, the role of dean will be assumed by the provost. In appeal cases involving courses taught by faculty from more than one college, the dean of University College will review the appeal and, if necessary, appoint the appeals committee. In these cases, the appeals committee shall include the additional chairperson(s). In unusual circumstances (e.g., death, incapacity, or indefinite accessibility of the instructor), the departmental chairperson is responsible for the final grade, subject to appeal by the student to the dean as described in this section.

Complete information on the rights and responsibilities of students and faculty relative to grade appeals is available at the Office of the Ombuds. If you need assistance in understanding the grade appeals process or in preparing a grade appeal(s), contact the Ombuds, Crewson House 200, 593.2627. The office will be able to be of greatest assistance if you make contact early in the process.

Master’s Degrees

^TOP

A minimum of 45 graduate credits is required for conferral of the master’s degree. You may not have more than 12 credits with a CR grade exclusive of practicum, internship, research, and thesis hours applied to your minimal credit requirements. Additional credits may be required by individual departments. You should develop a program of study approved by your advisor and the departmental graduate committee early in your first graduate quarter to ensure that you satisfy all degree requirements in the most efficient manner possible. Since graduate work implies advanced study and some degree of specialization, a certain amount of undergraduate preparation in the subject or field of study is presupposed before you may undertake graduate study in that subject or field.

In most departments a minimum of 27 undergraduate credits is required in the major area. Refer to the requirements listed by each program. It is your responsibility to ascertain whether a period of residence on the Athens campus is required in your major and to plan a program of study accordingly by consulting with your advisor and departmental graduate committee. A comprehensive examination may be required, the nature and timing of which is determined by the department.

Thesis Requirement

If you are in a thesis program, you will prepare the thesis under the guidance of your thesis director on a subject in the field of your major work (see “Restricted Publications of Theses or Dissertations”). The thesis provides an opportunity for you to formulate and express the results of research and study. You may meet the thesis requirement by presenting the results of a creative activity in literature, music, fine arts, or industrial arts, together with a written essay indicating the purpose, procedure, problems, and bibliography involved in the work. Each department prescribes the specific style manual to be followed by its students. You and your thesis director are responsible for maintaining accepted standards of grammar, sentence structure, punctuation, form, and scholarly style in the thesis. A pamphlet, “Format for the Presentation of Theses and Dissertations,” is available in the college deans’ offices. This pamphlet contains regulations regarding type, margins, quality of paper, and other aspects, as well as detailed directions for submitting the finished thesis. If you are writing a thesis, you must obtain from your dean’s office the current “Format” and the printed list of quarterly deadlines for graduation.

After the thesis has been approved by your thesis committee, thesis director, and dean, two copies are forwarded to Alden Library. In addition, one copy is retained in your department. The copies are bound and cataloged; one copy is placed in Archives and the other in the stacks. The thesis is considered a public document and made available to the public in the same manner as any other document cataloged within the University library. If you wish, you may submit a copy of the thesis to University Microfilms International for microfilming and entry into electronic databases.

Graduate students completing a thesis have the option of submitting their thesis in an electronic rather than paper copy format. A pamphlet titled “Guidelines for Preparation of Electronic Theses and Dissertations” describes this option. The pamphlet is available in the Office of Graduate Studies (McKee House). Students wishing to explore this option should contact the Office of Graduate Studies. Theses submitted electronically are available through OhioLink. A single paper copy is bound and placed in the library.

Oral Thesis Examination

An oral thesis examination is required of all students in a thesis program. The examining committee is composed of the director of the thesis (as chair) and two or more additional faculty members. You and your thesis director, in consultation with members of the examining committee, set a time and place for the examination. You must present final copies of the thesis to members of your examination committee at least two weeks before the date of your oral examination to allow adequate review of the manuscript. Results of the examination are reported to the Office of Graduate Studies and the Office of the University Registrar as soon as final approval of the thesis is given.

Nonthesis Option

Several departments have master’s degree programs with a nonthesis option. Consult with your advisor and carefully consider your career goals in deciding between a thesis or nonthesis option. Many academic areas regard a nonthesis master’s program as a terminal degree program.

Transfer of Credit

A maximum of 12 (quarter) credit hours may be transferred from an accredited university to a Master’s degree program of 45 hours at Ohio University. For Master’s degree programs longer than 45 hours, no more than 25 percent of the total graded coursework requirements may be transferred to the degree program (1 semester hour = 1.5 quarter hours).

To be eligible for transfer, courses must be designated as graduate credit at the institution where taken; letter graded B or better; earned within the past five years; applicable toward a graduate degree at the institution where taken; and earned in courses taught by members of that institution’s graduate faculty. Departments may set more restrictive limits on the number or type of transfer credit accepted. Master’s degree programs in the Center for International Studies may allow transfer of credit for less commonly taught languages as outlined in the Center’s program description.

Credits requested for transfer cannot have been used to satisfy requirements for completion of another degree. Courses equivalent to those at Ohio University cannot be transferred for credit and also be taken for credit at Ohio University. Credit is not accepted for courses taken by correspondence. Any request for transfer of credit must be recommended by your advisor and departmental graduate committee before final review and acceptance by your dean’s office. No letter grades will appear on the transcript for transferred courses, nor will they be calculated in your GPA.

Only courses counting toward an Ohio University degree are eligible to appear on the Ohio University transcript as transfer credit.

Time Limit

The maximum time allowed between the date when you first initiate graduate study toward a master’s degree and the date when you complete the requirements for the master’s degree is six calendar years. Any master’s degree program that requires more than 60 hours may increase the six-year time limit to seven years. Check with the Office of Graduate Studies or your graduate department to verify the time limit for your graduate program. If you do not complete your requirements within the time limit, you may be permitted to continue graduate study only if exceptional circumstances are associated with the delay.

The dean of your college may grant a one-time, one-quarter extension for the quarter immediately following the final quarter in which your degree requirements were to have been complete based on the Time Limit policy as described above. If circumstances require an extension of time beyond the one-quarter dean’s extension, you must apply for readmission to the program by completing a new application form and paying the reapplication fee. The graduate committee of the program and the dean of the college must review the readmission application. The criteria for readmission should be the currency of your courses, project, or thesis. The program may require retaking or adding particular courses, updating the project or thesis, taking additional practicum or internship hours, or fulfilling any degree requirements that have been added since the initiation of your program. If readmission is approved, the specifications for readmission must be presented to you in writing, with a copy placed on file in the Office of Graduate Studies.

Second and Dual Master’s Degrees

If you wish to earn a second or dual master’s degree at Ohio University, you must make formal application for admission to the department in which you are seeking the second or dual master’s degree and pay the appropriate application fee. For a second master’s degree, you must prepare a program of study for each master’s degree by listing the course number, name, and number of credits. You may use no more than three courses or up to a maximum of 15 credit hours from one master’s degree program to satisfy degree requirements in a second master’s degree program. Each program of study must be signed by the departmental graduate committee in both departments in which master’s degrees will be earned. You must then submit the programs of study to the Office of Graduate Studies for final approval. Any admission status given in a second master’s degree program must be regarded as provisional until the programs of study are received.

Doctoral Degrees

^TOP

The doctoral degree is granted on the basis of evidence that you have achieved a high level of scholarship and proficiency in research rather than solely on the basis of successful completion of a prescribed amount of coursework. Your competence and ability to work independently and write creatively are established by qualifying and comprehensive examinations and the quality of a dissertation submitted as an account of your original research.

A minimum of 135 hours beyond the bachelor’s degree must be completed for conferral of a doctoral degree.

Program of Study and Advisory Committee

The graduate committee of your department will assign an advisor and an advisory committee who must approve the proposed program of study for the degree. Graduate work completed at another university will be considered by the departmental graduate committee and your advisory committee in the development of your program of study. The guidelines for transfer of credit outlined in the previous section apply, with the exception of the maximum number of hours, which is waived for students pursuing doctoral degrees.

Typically, when the dissertation proposal is nearing approval, the departmental graduate committee will forward to the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled a recommendation for appointment of a dean’s representative, together with the names of other dissertation committee members and the title of your dissertation. Committee membership guidelines are set by each college. The committee must consist of at least three members representing the range of content in your program of study, in addition to the representative from the dean’s office.

Comprehensive Examination

When coursework is virtually completed, and upon the recommendation of the advisory committee, you take a comprehensive examination to establish your mastery of the fields of specialization and readiness for advanced research. The results of the examination must be reported within one week to the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled on a form provided by the dean’s office.

A copy of this form should be sent to the Office of Graduate Studies to be included in your academic file.

Scholarly Discipline Requirement

The doctoral degree by definition is research oriented, and each department determines the auxiliary research competencies needed by doctoral candidates. Competence is determined by standards and methods established by the individual department. If you expect to demonstrate proficiency in one of the scholarly disciplines in which examinations are arranged by your dean’s office (e.g., statistics, computer science, or foreign language), you must file an appropriate intent form. This form is available from and should be filed with the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled. You must be registered for a minimum of two hours in the quarter in which you take the examination.

The French, German, Russian, and Spanish proficiency examinations of the Educational Testing Service are given at Ohio University several times during the year. Information and application forms are available at the Department of Modern Languages, Gordy Hall 283.

Academic Residency Requirement

Normally, at least three academic quarters of the doctoral program are in continuous residence on the Athens campus in an institutional full-time status (registration for 9 graduate credits). If you receive Ohio University stipend support, you are considered to have instructional full-time status by registering for a minimum of 12 graduate credits for an assistantship, or a minimum of 15 graduate credits for Recruitment scholarship/stipend, fellowship, or tuition scholarship only.

The continuous residence requirement applies to the period of graduate study following the completion of the master’s degree or the completion of at least 45 graduate credits.

Admission to Candidacy

Admission to candidacy is achieved after you have completed the following steps: (1) formation of the dissertation committee (including the dean’s representative), which may be the same as your advisory committee; (2) approval of the research proposal by this committee; (3) successful completion of the comprehensive examination; and (4) satisfaction of all required scholarly disciplines.

Doctoral committee membership is determined by college policy. Check with the dean’s office for specific information.

Forms indicating completion of the above steps are available from and filed in the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled. You are not permitted to schedule the oral examination of the dissertation until you have met all requirements for admission to candidacy.

A copy of your admission- to-candidacy letter should be sent to the Office of Graduate Studies for inclusion in your official file.

Dissertation

A dissertation, the scholarly account of research in the new area of knowledge, is submitted by each candidate (see “Restricted Publications of Theses or Dissertations”). Each department prescribes the specific style manual to be followed by its students. A pamphlet, “Format for the Presentation of Theses and Dissertations,” is available in the deans’ offices. This pamphlet contains regulations regarding type, margins, quality of paper, abstract, and other aspects, as well as detailed directions for submitting the finished dissertation to the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled. You must obtain from your dean’s office the current “Format” and the list of quarterly deadlines for graduation.

After the dissertation has been approved by your dissertation committee, dissertation director, and dean, two copies are forwarded to Alden Library. In addition, one copy is retained in your department, and another is submitted to University Microfilms International for microfilming and entry into Dissertation Abstracts International. Upon the return of the copy from University Microfilms International, both copies are bound and cataloged; one copy is placed in Archives and the other in the stacks. The dissertation is considered a public document and made available to the public in the same manner as any other document cataloged within the University library.

A copy of the dissertation abstract should be sent to the Office of Graduate Studies for inclusion in your official file.

Doctoral students have the option of submitting their dissertation in an electronic rather than paper copy format. A pamphlet titled “Guidelines for Preparation of Electronic Theses and Dissertations” describes this option. The pamphlet is available in the Office of Graduate Studies (McKee House). Students wishing to explore this option should contact the Office of Graduate Studies. Dissertations submitted electronically are available through OhioLink. A single paper copy is bound and placed in the library.

Copyright

Dissertations can be copyrighted at the time the manuscripts are sent to University Microfilms International. Arrangements can be made through the library for this service. Under current copyright procedures, microfilming by University Microfilms International constitutes publication. You may lose the ability to obtain a copyright if your dissertation is not copyrighted at the time of submission to your dean’s office. For further information, contact the University Libraries administrative office in Alden Library 512.

Oral Dissertation Examination

An oral dissertation examination is required of all doctoral candidates. The examining committee is composed of your entire dissertation committee (including the representative of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled) unless otherwise specified by the associate provost for graduate studies. You must present final copies of the dissertation to members of the examining committee at least two weeks before the date of your oral examination to allow adequate time for review. The final arrangements for the examination must be completed through the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled at least 10 days prior to the examination. Details of the examination, including time and place, are sent by the dean’s office to you and the examiners.

The Office of Graduate Studies should be notified of the date that you passed the oral examination for inclusion in your official file.

Time Limit

You must complete the doctoral program of study within seven calendar years of the date of its initiation as determined by the department and recorded in the Office of Graduate Studies.

If you do not complete requirements for the degree within the given period, you may be permitted to continue in graduate study only if exceptional circumstances are associated with the delay in progress.

The dean of your college may grant a one-time, one-quarter extension for the quarter immediately following the final quarter in which your degree requirements were to have been completed. If circumstances require an extension beyond the one-quarter dean’s extension, you must apply for readmission to the program. The application for readmission must be reviewed by the graduate committee of the program and the dean of the college. Criteria for readmission should be the currency of your (1) knowledge of the required work, (2) research literature, and (3) research methods and techniques. The program may require additional coursework, retaking the oral/written comprehensive examination, changing or updating the dissertation, or fulfilling any degree requirements that have been added since the initiation of your program. If you are approved for readmission, the specifications for readmission must be presented to you in writing with a copy placed on file in the Office of Graduate Studies.

Restricted Publication of Theses or Dissertations

The University does not accept theses or dissertations containing material developed as part of a research project if the thesis or dissertation is restricted from publication. Publication, for this purpose, includes the cataloging and placement of the approved manuscript in the Ohio University Libraries and, for dissertations, microfilming by University Microfilms International. (University Microfilms International does allow authors to restrict the distribution of dissertations and theses.) Upon written request to your dean’s office, you may delay publication up to a maximum of 12 months if, in the judgment of the office, the data upon which your thesis or dissertation is based are proprietary and not available in the public domain. You must submit the request for delay with the formal approval of your advisor at least one academic quarter before the normal date of publication of the thesis or dissertation.

A thesis or dissertation completed at Ohio University is withheld from the public only if it has been approved for delayed publication following the procedures outlined above or if a question of plagiarism, libelous or abusive statements, or falsification or misrepresentation of data is raised, in which case the manuscript is withheld until the issue has been resolved.

For further information, consult Ohio University Policy and Procedure #19.051.

Students submitting theses or dissertations electronically may restrict electronic access to the documents for up to five years. This provision is made available to ensure individuals the opportunity to publish the thesis or dissertation work. For additional information about this option, students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies.

Registration

^TOP

Details concerning registration procedures are given in each quarter’s Schedule of Classes, which is available approximately two weeks before the beginning of priority registration each quarter on the Registrar’s web site.

If you are a graduate student with admission status your registration access code (RAC) changes quarterly. To obtain you vurrent RAC check your online DARS report from the Registrar’s web site. Former students whose admission status has expired through time limits must apply for a time extension, or reapply for admission. Students whose admission status has expired due to graduation must apply to a new degree or non-degree program.

You must be registered at the graduate level in any quarter in which you receive any service from the University or use its facilities. You must also be registered in the quarter in which you will graduate. Master’s students must be registered for at least one graduate credit hour, and doctoral students for at least two. Any exceptions to registration hour requirements must be approved by the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled.

If you are currently attending the University, you may register for a subsequent quarter.

 

Academic Calendar

Ohio University’s academic calendar is available online at www.ohio.edu/registrar/calendar.cfm

 

 

 

Identification Card

When you register, you will be given information about obtaining an identification card, issued by the Office of Information Technology (OIT). This card, which is automatically validated when you register, gives you access to campus services including the meal plan, library privileges, and the Student Health Service.

The card is issued free of charge according to these guidelines:

  1. If you are a new student, you are issued a card free of charge.
  2. If you are a re-enrolling student returning after one year or more, your old card will be valid upon registration. If you no longer have your old card, you will be issued a new card free of charge.
  3. If your name or Social Security number has changed, you will be issued a new card free of charge provided you return your old card when the new one is issued.

OIT charges a card replacement fee under these circumstances:

  1. You will be charged $10 to replace a card that is lost, stolen, or damaged within one year of your last quarter of enrollment. (A $5 refund will be issued if you find your old card and return it to OIT during the same quarter in which it was replaced.)
  2. If your name or Social Security number has changed, you will be charged $10 for a new card only if you do not return the old card. If you return the old card when the new one is issued, you will not be charged.

E-mail (your Oak account)

Your free Ohio University Oak e-mail account will be activated for you when you pick up your University ID Card at the Office of Information Technology (OIT), 154 HDL Center. You also may activate your account at technology.ohio.edu/myaccount. To activate your Oak account, you will need your Social Security Number and four-digit Registration Access Code (RAC).

It is imperative that you know your Oak account and password, as many Ohio University services use this to authenticate access.

Your Oak account includes the following features:

Free software (Mulberry)
Spam and virus filtering
Web-based access
Newtork file storage
Personal Web page capabilities

Please check your Oak e-mail regularly for official University correspondence. Quarterly grades, schedules, billing notification, and other University communications are sent to your Oak account. Many Ohio University departments and professors depend on Oak e-mail for both announcements and assignments. We do not recommend forwarding your Oak account.

If you have problems accessing your e-mail or have questions, call the University Services Center, 740.593.1222.

Full-Time Status

A graduate student enrolling for nine or more credits is assessed full-time fees. Students with graduate contracts are required to register for a minimum of 12 or 15 graduate hours, as described elsewhere in this catalog.

Veterans Educational Benefits

To receive full veterans benefits, you must register for at least nine quarter hours of graduate work. For more information about veterans benefits, contact the Veterans Coordinator, Registrar Staff Offices, Chubb Hall 108, 740.593.4186.

Auditing

To audit a course, follow the registration procedures outlined in the quarterly Schedule of Classes. The academic fees for auditing a course are the same as the fees for taking a course for credit. Since auditing is a grading option, you can change from audit to credit or credit to audit only by dropping the course and re-adding it with the correct grading option. You can make this change only during the first 15 calendar days of the quarter or the active registration period for the appropriate summer session. Refer to the Schedule of Classes for specific dates.

Your instructor may set up specific requirements for auditing a course, and if you do not meet the requirements, you may be removed from the class, at the instructor’s discretion, with a grade of WP or WF. Be sure to discuss your auditing status with the instructor at the first class meeting.

Courses taken for audit do not fulfill registration requirements for graduate appointments.

Cancellation of Registration

Your advisor or graduate chair, with the approval of the dean, may request that Graduate Studies cancel your registration because of poor academic performance, failure to meet course prerequisites, falsified signatures, failure to provide final transcripts, or other violations of University policy.

Grad Mass Hours

Students who enter Ohio University with post-baccalaureate degrees granted by another accredited university will receive graduate credit hours per State of Ohio subsidy requirements. This is reflected on the Degree Audit Report (DARS) as Grad Mass hours. Master?s equivalent degrees are credited as 51 Grad Mass hours. Doctoral equivalent degrees are credited as 120 Grad Mass hours.

International Students

To comply with immigration regulations, international students (F-1 or J-1 status) must register as full-time graduate students (nine hours per quarter maintains full-time status). Students must not drop any courses that would bring them below full-time status, register late, or withdraw from all classes without having the prior approval of an advisor in the Office of International Student and Faculty Services (ISFS).

Change Procedures

^TOP

Changing Your Class Schedule After Classes Begin

Note the terminology used in explanations of the deadlines that follow:

Quarter: any quarter, including the 10-week summer quarter

subterm: any five week summer session

In the case of flexibly scheduled classes (classes that meet for fewer days than a quarter or subterm), the deadlines are prorated. Contact the Office of the University Registrar for deadline dates.

You may add a class, drop a class, or correct your registration using the Web Registration system before the quarter or subterm begins. However, adding certain classes after classes begin requires special permission from the instructor and is prohibited after the 15th calendar day. Dropping any class after the 35th calendar day of a term or 17th calendar day of a subterm is prohibited except by petition through your college’s student services office. (See “Drops” below.)

Adds. You may add a class via Web Registration only during the first 8 calendar days of any quarter or subterm. However, please note that departments or individual instructors may close registration for their courses prior to the 8th calendar day. After the 8th calendar day and through the 15th calendar day of any quarter, you may add a class only with instructor permission. For classes requiring the instructor’s permission, you will need to obtain a permission slip from the instructor or departmental representative and then return the slip to the office indicated on the slip for final processing. You may add a class for which you have not met the prerequisite only by receiving the instructor’s permission to take the class.

After the first 15 calendar days of the quarter (8 calendar days of the subterm), your schedule becomes official. Your final tuition charges are based on your enrollment as of the deadline.

Drops.* You may use Web Registration to drop any class except your last class (see Canceling Registration or Withdrawing from the University below) through the 35th calendar day of a quarter or the 17th calendar day of a subterm. Dropping a class is prohibited after these deadlines, but under very exceptional circumstances you may petition your college in writing to make an exception. Your reason must be substantial. Fear of earning a low grade in the class, for example, is not considered to be an exceptional circumstance.

If you drop a class during the first 15 calendar days of a quarter or 8 calendar days of a subterm, there will be no record of that class on your academic record. When you drop a class after the 15th calendar day of a quarter (8th calendar day of a subterm), your instructor will assign either a grade of Withdrawn Passing (WP) or Withdrawn Failing (WF), indicating your academic progress at the time the class was dropped. These grades will appear on your academic record and subsequent DARS reports, in addition to your official transcript. They do not affect your GPA

If you drop hours through the 15th calendar day of a quarter (8th calendar day of a subterm), you are entitled to a 100 percent refund of the reduction if the change results in a reduction of registration fees provided you are not dropping all hours (see Canceling Registration or Withdrawing from the University below). Changes made after the deadlines will result in no refund. If you are receiving financial aid, a change in enrollment status may result in your having to repay programs from which you received aid. (See “Refund of Fees” for more information.)

After the first 15 calendar days of the quarter (8 calendar days of a subterm), your schedule becomes official. Your final tuition charges are based on your enrollment as of the deadline. If you withdraw from the University or reduce your course load after the deadline, you must still pay the full tuition fees and your class(es) will remain on your academic record with WP/WF grade(s). Withdrawal during the first 15 calendar days of a quarter or 8 calendar days of a subterm results in an 80 percent tuition refund.

Only in extreme instances in which circumstances beyond your control make you unable to have your registration in order by the 15th or 8th calendar day deadlines will the University consider making an exception to this policy. Even then, such decisions are made by a special review panel and require that formal documentation such as a doctor’s statement be submitted to the University Review Panel. The Office of Graduate Studies can help you present an appeal to the University Review Panel.

*NOTE: This policy is to be implemented for degree-seeking graduate students in the following way: during the time between registration and the end of the fifth week, you must inform your instructor and department graduate committee chair of your intent to drop a course. After the fifth week of the quarter and before the last class day of the quarter, you may petition your department graduate committee chair in writing to request a drop under special circumstances. If the department graduate committee chair approves the request, a copy of the special petition will go to the dean of your college for approval. Poor academic performance is not sufficient grounds for dropping a course. Graduate students who are not formally part of a graduate program are covered by the drop policy as it applies to undergraduates.

Canceling Registration or Withdrawing from the University (Dropping All Classes)

Cancellation Before Classes Have Begun. Cancellation of registration is defined as dropping all classes before the first day of classes. This includes all classes for which you are registered on all (one or more) campuses, but not distance learning courses in the Division of Lifelong Learning, for which students register and pay separately. You may cancel your registration by using Web Registration , or you can call or visit the registrar’s office or the student services office of your college to obtain a cancellation of registration form, which you then complete and return to the registrar’s office. An adjustment of your registration fees is

Withdrawing After Classes Have Begun. Withdrawing from the University is defined as dropping all classes on or after the first day of classes and no later than the day before the last day of classes for the quarter or subterm. Note that this means all regular Ohio University classes for which a student is registered for a given term, whether on one campus or more than one. This does not prevent a student from registering for a future term. Withdrawal is not permitted on or after the last day of classes. This may not be done using Web Registration . Apply for withdrawal by completing a withdrawal request form obtained from the student services office of your college or regional campus. When the request has been approved by the college or regional campus student services office and housing, your withdrawal is processed by the registrar’s office, which grants an official withdrawal after determining that all obligations to the University have been met.

Tuition Issues

When changes in a student’s registration affect the total registration in a way that changes the amount of tuition, the student will receive the appropriate fee adjustment or pay the appropriate forfeiture for the class(es) dropped, according to the deadlines for those classes, and the tuition for the remaining registration will be recalculated.

Tuition for summer students who schedule a total of 9 or more hours in any combination of summer registration in the full term or the two subterms will be calculated in the usual way (1-8 hours equal part-time, 9-18 hours equal full-time). When dropping classes affects the total registration for the summer in a way that changes the basis for tuition, the tuition will be recalculated for the remaining registration, and the student will receive the appropriate fee adjustment or pay the appropriate forfeiture for the class(es) dropped, according to the deadlines for those classes.

Your change in enrollment status may result in your having to repay programs from which you have received financial aid. See the Refund of Fees and Financial Aid sections for further information.

Multiple Consecutive Withdrawals. Two or more consecutive withdrawals can be cause for placement of a registration hold on your record by the registrar or your academic dean. A petition to release this hold would be considered by your academic dean.

Withdrawing for Medical Reasons. In the event of serious physical or mental illness, you may arrange for a medical withdrawal from the University. Your withdrawal will be effective on the date you sought treatment from the Student Health Service for your illness or injury, or the last date you attended classes, depending on your particular circumstances. If you were treated by an outside physician who has recommended a medical withdrawal, that recommendation must be sent to the medical director of the Student Health Service.

To arrange for a medical withdrawal, contact the medical director of the Student Health Service (for physical health problems) or the director of Counseling and Psychological Services (for mental health problems). The director will make a written recommendation to your academic dean for a medical withdrawal.

It is possible to withdraw for medical reasons through the day before the last day of classes for the quarter or the summer subterm. After that, the appropriate director and the dean of your college must agree on the withdrawal.

If you are granted a medical withdrawal, you will receive notification in the mail from the medical director. A fee adjustment, if applicable, will be based on the effective date of your withdrawal and will be made according to the schedule in the Refund of Fees section. A medical hold will be placed on your records, and to re-enroll you will have to request a medical clearance from the appropriate director. When the clearance is approved, the hold will be released.

You may not be reinstated until the Office of Graduate Studies has received written clearance from the Student Health Service.

Class Attendance Policy

The weight given to class attendance in determining your grade is an academic matter; thus, all instructors are responsible for their own attendance policies. Though your instructor will state specific attendance requirements during the first week of classes each quarter, the University does expect you to attend classes regularly.

Excused Absences. Although instructors’ policies govern how excused absences will be handled in their classes, certain absences are considered legitimate by the University. These include illness, death in the immediate family, religious observance, jury duty, and involvement in University-sponsored activities.

If you are returning to class after a legitimate absence, you can expect your instructors’ assistance (makeup work, excused absences, recalculation of the student’s grade based on remaining work) within the limits of their established attendance policies. There are occasions when the size or the nature of the course makes it necessary to limit the number of excused absences or the availability of makeup work, particularly for examinations or such special events as field trips or outside speakers. Such limitations should be explained in the instructor’s attendance policy at the beginning of each course. If you are involved in University activities that may conflict with your class schedule, check with your instructor as early as possible to make satisfactory arrangements. You may document reasons for your absence as follows:

If you are participating in an authorized University activity (departmental trip, music or debate activity, ROTC function, or athletic competition), you can obtain notification from the sponsoring office. If you are hospitalized at O’Bleness Memorial Hospital, you are not issued a notification of class absence. However, you may request that your instructor call the Student Health Service to verify your hospitalization. If you receive outpatient care at the Student Health Service, you will not be issued a notification of class absence. However, if you give written permission for the information to be released, you may request that your instructor call for verification that you received outpatient care. It is assumed that, whenever possible, you will visit the health service as an outpatient without missing class.

If you receive medical care from personnel or facilities other than the Student Health Service, you are required to provide verification of the dates you received care.

If your grade has been affected by a legitimate absence or absences that your instructor does not excuse, you may appeal through the normal grade appeal process (first through the instructor, then the department chair or school director, and then the dean of your college). If satisfaction is not achieved through this process, the dean will appoint a faculty committee of five members, including the chair or director of the department or school in question, to consider your case and render a decision. The decision of this committee is not subject to further appeal.

Two-Hour Rule. If you miss the first two contact hours of a class for which you have registered, the instructor has the option of not admitting you to the class. (This policy applies to the first two hours of a class, not to the first two class meetings.) If you miss the first two contact hours, check with your instructor to verify your status in the class. If you have not been admitted, you will need to drop the class through Web Registration . (See “Change of Course Schedule.”)

Note: If the instructor does not admit you to the class, you still must drop the class from your schedule using Web Registration . Otherwise, you will receive an F, an FN (failure, never attended), or an FS (failure stopped attending) for the class at the end of the quarter.

Classroom Privacy Observation and evaluation of any classroom (including online) by any observer or evaluator requires prior notification of all students in the class. Recording of classroom activities by any electronic means, by students, other faculty, University administrators, or others, requires permission of the instructor. All students in a class must be informed if permission has been given for a class to be recorded.

Change in Program Requirements As a degree candidate, you must either (a) meet the requirements set forth in the Graduate Catalog at the time of your initial registration in a graduate degree program, or (b) should you choose to follow the requirements of a later catalog, meet those requirements in their entirety. In the event of program changes, departments are expected to make appropriate adjustments to allow you to fulfill the requirements of the initial program of study. If an extension of time beyond one quarter is granted, you are generally expected to meet all requirements of the program at the time of the extension request. Requests for such extensions must incorporate a detailed explanation of the means employed to meet modifications in requirements enacted since your entry. This information is considered by the graduate committee and the dean of the college as part of the approval process. (This paragraph does not apply to students in the College of Osteopathic Medicine.)

Change of Personal Information You must report any changes in your personal data to the Office of the University Registrar. This includes changes in name, social security number, birth date, address, telephone number, or emergency contact information. Requests for changes in name, social security number, or birth date must be accompanied by documentation verifying the correct information as required by the registrar’s office. These requests should be sent to Registrar Services Windows, First Floor, Chubb Hall.

Address, telephone number, and emergency contact information may be updated online at www.ohio.edu/registrar/ by selecting “Update My Address” (Oak ID and password are required to use this service). In addition, you may also update this information by e-mailing address@ohio.edu (be sure to include the last four digits of your Person Identification [PID] number and full name), or stopping by the Registrar Services Windows (First Floor, Chubb Hall), your regional campus student services office, or your college student services office.

Note: International students in F-1 or J-1 status must use the online address update service to update their address with Ohio University to meet immigration reporting requirements. Students can easily update their address by accessing the Office of the University Registrar Web site, www.ohio.edu/registrar, and selecting Update MyAddress under Online Services. For details, contact the Office of International Student and Faculty Services (ISFS), (740) 593-4330.

An international student must meet with an advisor in ISFS to have a new visa document issued prior to registering for a new major or program or starting a new degree level.

You are responsible for any University communication sent to you at your official University e-mail address (Oak account) and/or mailing address on file with the Office of the University Registrar.

Late Registration

^TOP

Registration is not permitted after the first 15 calendar days of the quarter (in the case of some individual classes, after the first day). All registration procedures should be completed by the 15th calendar day of the quarter.

In cases where late registration is necessary, you will be charged a retroactive registration correction fee beginning with the third calendar week of each quarter unless late changes are the result of University delays as judged by the registrar. The fees are listed in the quarterly Schedule of Classes.

Leave of Absence Policy

^TOP

Students enrolled in a degree program who do not expect to make progress toward their degree for a period of time due to personal, medical, or professional reasons may request a leave of absence from a degree program. Students on an approved leave of absence may not make significant use of university resources and services or engage in significant consultation with the faculty.

To request a leave of absence, a student shall submit to the departmental graduate chair or director of graduate studies a written request stating the reason for the leave and expected duration of the leave. All foreseeable leaves of absence must be requested prior to leaving the campus. Each program or department will establish a process for reviewing and approving leaves of absence requests. Departments should also have in place a plan to address any incompletes at the time leave is undertaken. Approved leaves will be documented for the student in writing, with a copy forwarded to the college office and the Office of Graduate Studies for recording in the student’s file.

It is the responsibility of the student to resolve all issues pertaining to financial support, federal financial aid, and any outstanding debt to the University prior to a leave of absence. Prior to the completion of the leave of absence, the student must notify the departmental graduate chair or director of graduate studies so that the reentry process can be initiated.

To be eligible for a leave of absence, a graduate student must not have received an extension of the time limit for the degree. A leave of absence will not extend the time limit for completion of a degree (six calendar years for master’s degrees of less than 60 hours; seven calendar years for master’s degrees of 60 or more hours and doctoral degrees).

A student who does not return and register in the degree program at the conclusion of an approved leave of absence is considered dropped from the program.

International students in F-1 or J-1 nonimmigrant status must also obtain authorization from International Student and Faculty Services prior to the initiation of a leave of absence and before retuning to campus to ensure compliance with current SEVIS regulations and visa restrictions.

Requesting a leave of absence will ensure that your academic program is aware of your plans, and will assist in ensuring that loose ends which could pose future problems are taken care of. It also provides confirmation for third parties of your status as a student on an approved leave.

Withdrawal from the University

^TOP

Apply for withdrawal on a withdrawal form obtained from the Office of Graduate Studies. When the request for withdrawal has been approved by the associate provost for graduate studies, the order is referred to the Office of the University Registrar, which grants an official withdrawal after it has been determined that all obligations to the University have been met. A refund of registration fees is made according to regulations. Refer to the current Schedule of Classes for timelines and a full description of the Refund of Registration Fee Policy.

If you withdraw after the 15th calendar day of any quarter, you will receive a WP/WF grade in each course. If you fail to complete the work of a course and do not complete an authorized withdrawal, you will have an F, FN, or FS reported for the course.

If you have withdrawn from the University for medical reasons, you may not be reinstated until the Office of Graduate Studies has received a written clearance from the Student Health Service.

Student Records Information

^TOP

Student Records Policy

Consistent with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, all of Ohio University’s policies and practices governing the collection, maintenance, review, and release of student records will be based upon the principles of confidentiality and your individual right to privacy. The specific policy is detailed in the Appendix of this catalog.

Obtaining Transcripts

Students may order official transcripts in one of the these types:

  1. Comprehensive transcript, showing all coursework at Ohio University
  2. Undergraduate transcript only
  3. Graduate (master’s and Ph.D.) transcript only
  4. Medical transcript only

There is a $5.00 per transcript fee for regular processing (generally 2-3 business days). There is a $10.00 fee for each transcript processed on the same day requested. Transcripts may be ordered online, by mail with a signed letter of request including payment by check or credit card, by signed FAX with payment by credit card, or in person at the Registrar Services Windows. The student is required to provide his/her signature authorizing release of his/her transcript. Online orders may be “automatically authorized” without the student’s signature. To find out more about the various processing, application, and delivery options available and to obtain a transcript request form, visit the Registrar Services Windows in Chubb Hall, go to the registrar’s Web site at www.ohio.edu/registrar/transcri.cfm, phone the Registrar’s Office, 740.593.4206, or send e-mail to transcripts@ohio.edu.

Replacement of Diploma

To obtain a replacement diploma, provide a notarized affidavit attesting that the original diploma has been lost or destroyed, or verification of a name change, to the registrar’s office along with a request for a new diploma. In the case of a name change, you also must return the original diploma. Instructions for verifying a name change are available from the registrar’s office. The fee for diploma replacement is $15. Visit www.ohio.edu/registrar/grd.cfm for more details.

The replacement diploma will be the same size as the current diploma, carry current titles and signatures of University officers and the notation “official replacement.” Allow four to six weeks for delivery.

Academic Misconduct

^TOP

All forms of academic misconduct are prohibited by the Student Code of Conduct. Academic misconduct refers to dishonesty in assignments or examinations (cheating); presenting the ideas or the writing of someone else as your own (plagiarism); or knowingly furnishing false information to the University by forgery, alteration, or misuse of University documents, records, or identification. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to, permitting another student to plagiarize or cheat from your work; submitting an academic exercise (written work, printing, sculpture, computer program) that has been prepared totally or in part by another; acquiring improper knowledge of the contents of an exam; using unauthorized material during an exam; submitting the same paper in two different courses without the knowledge and consent of your professors; or submitting a forged grade change slip.

If you have committed any act of academic misconduct as determined by the judgment of a faculty member or by the procedures of the Office of University Judiciaries, serious action-which may include failure of work undertaken, failure in the course, and formal disciplinary action, including suspension or expulsion by the Office of University Judiciaries-will be taken against you.

In cases of academic misconduct, a faculty member has the authority to grant a failing grade. If your course grade is lowered by an instructor who has accused you of plagiarism, you may appeal this grade first through the instructor, then the department chair or school director, and then the dean of your college. If satisfaction is not achieved through this process, the dean will appoint a faculty committee of five members, including the chair or director of the department or school, to consider your case and render a decision. The decision of this committee is not subject to further appeal.

The faculty member also has the discretion to refer your case to the director of judiciaries. The director of judiciaries, the University Hearing Board, and the University Appeal Board have the authority to take formal action that includes, but is not limited to, suspension or expulsion from the University. However, the director of judiciaries, the University Hearing Board, and the University Appeal Board have no authority to modify a grade given by a faculty member.

If you wish to appeal an action of University Judiciaries or the University Hearing Board, such as suspension or expulsion, you can take the matter to the University Appeal Board. Details of appeal procedures are included in the Student Handbook.

Further information on academic misconduct is available from the Office of University Judiciaries, 349 Baker University Center, telephone 740.593.2629.

Degree Revocation Academic honesty is a core value of Ohio Univerisity. Degrees awarded may be revoked by the President of Ohio University in the accordance with Ohio University’s policies and procedures.

Intellectual Property Policy

^TOP

The University intellectual property policy is defined by Ohio University Policy and Procedure 17.001. In accordance with state law (Section 3345.44, Ohio Revised Code), patentable inventions created by Ohio University faculty, staff, and students are the property of the University if the work was supported by University funds or performed in University controlled facilities. Computer software and databases are the property of the University if created as part of University-assigned duties. The policy provides for a generous sharing of any royalties among the inventors and the relevant University units, departments, and colleges. Students are encouraged to read the complete policy and procedures on the Web-at www.ohio.edu/policy/17-001.html -or contact the Technology Transfer Office, 20 E. Circle Drive, Suite 190, telephone 740.593.1818.

Research Using Human Subjects

^TOP

The investigator in any research involving human subjects at Ohio University is expected to conduct any and all such experiments in compliance with Ohio University Policy and Procedure 19.052.

In summary, this policy applies to research investigations involving human subjects conducted by faculty, staff, or students at or under the auspices of Ohio University. Studies that require review include everything from clinical trials to surveys, interviews, and observation.

The purpose of the policy is to protect the rights and personal privacy of individuals, to assure a favorable climate for the conduct of scientific inquiry, and to protect the interests of Ohio University. Ohio University’s policy on research involving human subjects is in compliance with the requirements set forth in the National Research Act (P.L. 93-348) and the regulations on public welfare set forth in Part 46 of Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations (45 CFR 46).

For details concerning the scope and purpose of this policy and for information concerning procedures, see the Ohio University Policy and Procedures Manual or contact the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

Graduation and Annual Commencement Exercise

^TOP

You must apply for graduation through the Registrar’s Office and pay the graduation fee by the date indicated in the University calendar. You may apply online at www.ohio.edu/registrar. If you fail to meet graduation requirements in that quarter, you must reapply for graduation and pay the graduation reapplication fee by the date indicated in the University calendar for the quarter in which you will meet graduation requirements. Questions about applying for graduation may be sent to graduation@ohio.edu. You must submit all work to be applied toward meeting degree requirements no later than the last day of classes of the quarter in which you expect to graduate. Additional deadlines to be met by students writing theses or dissertations are available in the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled.

The annual commencement is held at the close of spring quarter in June. Master’s and doctoral degree recipients from the preceding winter, fall, and summer quarters are invited to attend, along with spring quarter candidates. Doctoral candidates must be approved for graduation by their college dean before they may participate.

Academic attire with appropriate hoods is worn by candidates at the commencement exercises. Make arrangements for purchasing academic attire through the Office of University Events.

Official Notifications for Students

^TOP

Various state and federal laws require Ohio University to provide information and notice to students on a variety of topics. In addition, Ohio University occasionally develops statements or policies on important matters and distributes them to all students. Below is a listing of official notifications that are currently provided to students.

Notices on these topics are provided via e-mail to all registered students as of the deadline for registration in each academic quarter. E-mail is sent to each student’s official University e-mail address (Oak account). These notices are routinely available at the University’s Web site at: www.ohio.edu/notifications.

Further, it is a student’s responsibility to know and follow current requirements and procedures at the departmental, college, and University levels, including those described in the University’s Undergraduate Catalog, Graduate Catalog, Guide for Residential Living, and University Policy and Procedures. All students are subject to the rules of behavior as outlined in the Student Code of Conduct.

  • Student Code of Conduct
  • University Regulations Regarding Concealed Gun Law
  • Consequences for Involvement in Civil Disturbance
  • Graduation/Transfer-Out Rates (Student Right to Know Act of 1990)
  • Crime Awareness and Campus Security (Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act)
  • Drugs and Alcohol (Drug-Free School and Community Act of 1989)
  • Convictions for Certain Riot-related and Sexual Assault Offenses (Ohio House Bill 95)
  • Campus Disruption (Ohio House Bill 1219)
  • Voter Registration (Voter Registration Provision in Higher Education Amendments of 1998)
  • Student Privacy (The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 or FERPA)
  • Copyright Infringement and the Internet
  • Emergency Closing of the University
  • Statement on Hate-Motivated Behavior
  • Statement on Sexual Assault

Questions regarding notifications can be addressed to the Office of the Dean of Students, 345 Baker University Center, 740.593.1800, deanstu@ohio.edu.

 

^TOP